How to Spot A Scam

Spot a work at home scam a mile away. There is no reason why you should be victim of one. Use your time more usefully finding genuine work at home resources.

When is a ‘Work From Home Program’ a scam. Here are a few pointers that will tell you that work from home job offer is a scam. If you see any of these present in the advertisement or the website that you are looking at, the warning bells should sound and you should walk away from this so called ‘opportunity’ now!

Is the company telling you can make hundreds of dollars in a single day or a week without requiring to have any special experience or know how?

Does the job involve work like data entry, form filling, typing etc.?

Does the company require you to pay a registration fee to join and start your work?

Is the work offer vague where you are told that you will be given the assignment or the way to make hundreds of dollars after you sign up with the registration fee?

All that you can see about the company or the website is some name that you have never heard of. They refrain from giving any real details about themselves such as an address, phone number and the contact information of some one you can actually speak to. At the most, you can leave messages on a number.

The whole website reads like an advertisement with a lot of CAPITAL LETTERS and exclamation marks !!!!!

If any of these true, the alarm bells should be going off just about right now!

Check Out the Job Listings
If it isn’t listed in the job posting, find out if there’s a salary or if you’re paid on commission. For work at home jobs, ask how often are you paid and how you are paid. Ask what equipment (hardware / software) you need to provide.
You will not Get Rich Quick (Really)
Avoid listings that guarantee you wealth, financial success, or that will help you get rich fast. Stay clear of listings that offer you high income for part-time hours. They will do none of the above.
Hang on to Your Money
Do not send money! Legitimate employers do not charge to hire you or to get you started. Do not send money for work at home directories or start-up kits.
Check References
Ask for references if you’re not sure about the company’s legitimacy. Request a list of other employees or contractors to find out how this has worked for them. Then contact the references to ask how this is working out. If the company isn’t willing to provide references (names, email addresses and phone numbers) do not consider the opportunity.
Think Twice
If it sounds too good to be true, you can be sure it is! Also, read any “offers” you get very carefully. One candidate for employment got a very detailed job offer from an employer. The only problem was that she hadn’t applied for the job and buried deep within the lines was a request for her bank account information, so the employer could pay her. It was a scam, of course, but with some of the well-written ones it can be hard to tell.

Work at Home Jobs To Avoid

Assembly Jobs – No, you cannot make lots of money assembling craft kits or any other type of kits. You can waste money on a package to get you started though. This holds true for a majority of the product assembling companies. However, there are some and very few out there that are actually working with home based workers. The real scam behind product assembling begins with websites that sell you the list of assembling companies for a price. It is available for free on http://www.assembleandearn.com.
Data Entry Jobs – You will see lots of listings for data entry jobs. They are usually either positions posting ads or a sales pitch for a kit that will get you started. They are NOT data entry jobs to begin with.
Multi-Level Marketing (MLM) which involves recruiting new people, and more new people, to sell the product. This was a great idea several years back and some people did make a lot of money. But they were the premiers of this field. If you try to begin this work now you will be trying to do what tens of thousands of people are doing as well. You will not make any money doing this. Selling MLM schemes is a tough thing to do in today’s day. Do not become a part of it.
Online Businesses – Do you want to start your own online business and get rich? Be very wary of these type of ads too. You will just be paying for some ebook or guide that will give you information that you already know or can easily read on the Internet for free.
Posting Ads – There are many ads saying workers are needed to post ads on online bulletin boards and forums. You don’t get paid to post, rather you may get paid if other people sign-up.
Processing Claims – In order to get “hired” you’ll need to buy equipment, software and pay for training. You are basically on your own after that. You will need to find your own clients, get business from them and hope that there are enough people interested in your services which is really a great improbability.
Stuffing Envelopes – Believe it, or not, there are still people saying that you can earn $3 or $4 per envelope to stuff them. You cannot. All major companies have postage machines, which stuff, sort and meter mail. No one is going to waste resources paying you to do it. The whole concept is ridiculous.

Victim Of A Scam? Here is what you need to know

What you need to know and do if you are a victim of a fraudulent ‘work at home’ program. Follow these steps and get your money back.

What to do if you get caught in one of many Home Based Business Scams
You should know that the No Questions Asked Money Back guarantee that is usually offered when you are first signing up for the work at home plan is never honored. They are either have too many loopholes or the people providing it are just too plain dishonest to give your money back. We have done an extensive section on the bogus guarantee that is usually offered with the work at home plans and how the people giving it intend to dodge around it. Please read it.
Nevertheless, if you become a victim of a work-at-home scheme, ask the company for a refund. If they refuse or give you an evasive response, tell them you plan to notify law enforcement officials.
Keep careful records of everything you do to recover your money. Document your phone calls, keep copies of all paperwork such as letters and receipts, and record all costs involved, including the time you spend. If the company refuses to refund your investment, contact:
First you need to write to the company who was involved in Home Based Business Scams that you feel has ripped you off telling them you would like your money back. If they do not agree with you then you need to let them know you plan to notify officials.

The following people should be notified:

If you read about this work-at-home scheme in a magazine. Let the editor know the particular company is involved in Home Based Business Scam.

The Attorney General’s Office in your state or in the state where the bogus Home Based Business Scams Company is located.

National Fraud Information Centre Call them if you feel you are a victim of a Home Based Business Scams. Check out their web site for daily alerts or new Home Based Business Scams. 1-800-876-7060

Your local Consumer Protection Offices.

Your local Better Business Bureau (BBB) and the BBB in the state of the Home Based Business Scams operator. The BBB site states the following:
Your local Better Business Bureau (www.bbb.org) Your local or state consumer affairs agency; The U.S. Postal Inspection Service (www.usps.com/postalinspectors/) Your state’s attorney general’s office (www.naag.org) or the office in the state where the company; The advertising manager of the publication that ran the ad you answered. All it took for me to have my money refunded was to tell the company that I was planning to contact law enforcement. Hopefully, if you are victim of a scam you will not have to go through these steps, but it is good information to have just in case.

Postmaster. If you received the misleading Home Based Business Scams information through the mail.

The Federal Trade Commission. While the FTC cannot resolve individual Home Based Business Scams, the agency can take action if there is evidence of a pattern of deceptive or unfair practices. To register a complaint about any Home Based Business Scams, write to: Correspondence Branch, Federal Trade Commission, and Washington, D.C. 20580.

Different Kinds Of Work From Home Scams

The commonest scams that you should not become a target of. They could not only cause you to loose money but get into problems with the law. You could pay a fine and even imprisonment.

We have written about the data entry scams and frauds in another article. In this one, we are going to discuss some more. What you need to know about some of the prevalent frauds is that they are not just about getting you to pay them a few dollars. Some of them could get you into serious trouble with the law. There is a well-known incident of a woman who got imprisoned because she got taken in by one of the scam schemes involving money transfer after she responded to a classified on the Internet. That is another story and you can read in the follow up article.
I have personally fallen to victim of work from home scams and thankfully ended up loosing some money and not on the other side of the law, which CAN and DOES happen if you are not careful.
Scams regarding making huge sums of cash from home do not just come in the form of fraudulent websites. They can be classified ads on and off the internet and they can also arrive to you in the postal mail.
You need to know that if it sounds too good to be true, then it really is. If it feels like a scam, be careful. We understand you may need the money but all you are likely to end up doing is loosing even more money and even have a run in with the law. Its just not worth it.
One of the reasons why ‘Work From Home Scams’ are so despicable is that they exploit and cheat the people who can least afford it. The people who are most likely to fall victims to work from scams are the people who are hard up for money. They want desperately to believe that this so-called ‘program’ will be the end of problems for them.
I have had people tell me that they do not even have the money for the registration and so are going to borrow. I have done my best to discourage them from sending money to these companies. Some of them saw sense while others did not.

Here are a few examples:

Form Filling / Data Processing / eMail Proseccing for seemingly professional Companies, Stores, Malls etc:

The latest is the example of a person who is known to me. She has been laid off from a garment retail chain owing to the recent cutbacks all across the US. She did not get the promised position as they could not afford to promote her. She was in desperate need of money and she came across advertisements and subsequently the website. The website was not a typical data entry or home typing website. It was a professional looking interface saying that they paid you for processing data for a store front. They had customers in their database and what you needed to do was process this information in a data sheet such as excel and send them emails with product deals and updates. Now, anyone would say that this sounds like a legitimate work option as all the big retail stores maintain a database for their customers and so send them updates on product deals and discounts via email and sms. The catch? You have to pay $150 to join this work. No matter how professional the website sounds, please know that the real employers DO NOT ask you to pay to join. Have you ever heard of any one saying that they went for a job interview and were asked to pay up to join? The companies hire people out of necessity and are just as eager to find able people. And yes, the malls and retail chains use people to send email and maintain databases, but they have an office and employ people the regular way to work even from home. The biggest companies like FedEx and Boeing employ people to work from home. They will never ask you to PAY to join a job.

Money Email Scam
I have received emails and faxes for this scam countless times. The Better Business Bureau reports that this scam has been around for ages, however, with the dawn of email it has taken on a whole new life. The fund fraud transfers scams can come to you through email, fax, or even by personal mail. The sender, who claims to be a government official or member of a royal family, requests assistance in transferring millions of dollars of excess money out of Nigeria and promises to pay the person for his or her help. The message is always of an urgent, private nature. Although the country primarily listed is Nigeria, I have seen other countries listed with the same urgent news.

Those willing to assist are asked to provide their banking account number, Social Security number, birth date, and often times other personal information. Or they are asked to send money to the letter-sender for taxes and various fees. Victims will never see their money again and the con artist pockets the money.

You may think that there is no way that people could fall for such a ridiculous scam, but the FBI reports annual losses of millions of dollars to just these types of schemes. In fact, some victims have actually been lured to Nigeria, where they were imprisoned.

If you should receive an email of this nature immediately delete or throw away any such correspondence. If you have already, however, responded to this scam or know someone who has, please contact the U.S. Secret Service as soon as possible by phone (202.406.5572) or by email (419.fcd@usss.treas.gov) immediately.

Assembling Products and Crafts Work
This is a hugely gray area when it comes to working from home to earn money. There are lots of companies that are out there who will scam you into sending them money to buy supplies to make craft products of them. We can say that about 90% of them are scams and not real. But there ARE some GENUINE companies that pay you for this work. Do not pay anyone to get the list of the companies. It is available free on www.assembleandearn.com. It is a completely free resource and tell you how to proceed with this work if you want. However, typically how this scam words is that you send a company money to send you supplies to put together different types of crafts, bows, or other type of small project. You send hundreds of dollars to the company for supplies who have claimed they will pay you “x” amount of dollars if you put the items together as instructed. You will invest hours of your time into putting these crafts together only to have the company tell you that you did not meet the “standards” for the work that they have sent. They will then send the materials back to you that you will be stuck with the items and you will also be out a bunch of your own money which you had invested.

UPS & Federal Express Recovery Scam
Do not get roped in with this home based work scam just because it mentions UPS and FedEx. These are legitimate companies but they are not the ones offering this employment.

The claim with this software is that companies that send out large amounts of shipments through Federal Express or UPS do not have the time to track these packages. If the packages are even one minute late with delivery, you are entitled to a full refund. With these “amazing” software packages, you will now be able to track all these parcels for the companies. You simply call on behalf of your clientele and they will get fifty percent of the refund while you pocked the other fifty percent. These people will agree to this because this is money that they wouldn’t have had otherwise. You can make $50-75 an hour and download the list of the packages while you are sitting in your robe and sipping your coffee. Doesn’t that sound wonderful?

First of all, neither Federal Express nor UPS is affiliated with any of these software programs. They also have every right to refuse the refund to you, a third-party who did not pay for the shipping in the first place. UPS online tracking system can only be used by the sender of the package or by the recipient. Besides, information obtained through the tracking system can only be used to monitor one’s shipment and not for someone’s commercial gain unless UPS openly authorizes it. To top it off, UPS prohibits any uses of automated software to access its online shipping-related systems. Therefore, the software you would be using would be deemed illegal.

I guess I had been under the assumption that they would be providing a list of people to contact that would be interested in these services. What they did provide was a list of general types of companies to target like the health industry, industrial services, or retail companies. Through this list you are supposed to come up with a list of people you think would be interested in your services, try to obtain the name and email address of the correct person who should be targeted, and send them this letter that the company has so kindly supplied for you. Then you just sit back and watch people chomping at the bit to get this amazing service. Who in the world would ever give out any of this private tracking information on their packages to a complete stranger? The answer to that, of course, would be no one in their right mind.
Envelope Stuffing
This is perhaps the oldest of the scams to exist. Even before the advent of internet. It should be around in the classified ads of newspapers. What it is in reality is mail fraud. No one is paying you to stuff envelopes. You get the impression that some companies are paying to stuff envelopes with their brochures and mailers to their customer. What you will actually be doing is placing the same bogus ads in classifieds and internet and when people pay you, stuffing the envelope with the same bogus information, sending it to them and telling them to continue the same chain.
This is not just a waste of time. It’s illegal. It is called mail fraud that is punishable by a fine and even imprisonment.

Data Entry
Commonest scam you see today in spite of all that has been written and said about it. It is flourishing as people are still making money out of it. You won’t unless you are ready to cheat people out of their’s. This section has been covered in detail in another article. Read it.

Medical Transcriptions
There are tons of phony advertisements out there for this job. While knowing medical transcription is great in a traditional work place, unless you personally know the company and they check out with the Better Business Bureau, be very wary of these types of job listings. The typical scenario usually plays out with the company telling you that you can make hundreds of dollars working from home and all you will need is the CD Rom which will have everything you need to know about medical transcription and at the end of their course you will officially be certified and people will be dying to hire you because of your qualifications. After purchasing your software and the computer system needed in order to link with the central computer system for “training purposes” you will have spent thousands of dollars with absolutely little or nothing to show for it. There will be no job and no clients with an amazing certification from Jon Doe’s Medical Transcription Online Schooling Company and you will have wasted both your time and money into yet another fruitless cause.

Wah Offers Are Full Of Scams

How to spot any work at home scam and what to do if stuck in one. Learn about the infectious ‘I Want To Believe’ syndrome. It could make you loose money if you catch it!

We cannot progress further without addressing this important issue. Whether you find a real telecommuting job or not, you should not end up loosing your money to some scam! Please do NOT pay any money to any company that is asking you to pay up to join some earning program. It does not matter what the sales copy says. It can be simple data entry, it could be transcription or email processing. None of this works.
Trust your instincts. Avoid the “I WANT TO BELIEVE FEELING” which is the feeling of looking at a work at home offer that sounds too good to be true but you WANT to believe it because it sounds soooooo goood. Don’t. It will result in you loosing money.
The only real jobs home based jobs out there are the ones that SOUND and READ real. They will be from employers that are real with a real address and phone with a contact person that you can talk to before applying. And they will ask for things like work experience, resume and skills just like a normal regular job. And a lot of these employers hire locally. Do not fret we are going to point you to your local job listings as well.
Look at the following points to avoid home working scams. These are the trademark qualities of a scam:

Does the business or “job” offer several hundred dollars a week working from home without doing much work? Is this realistically possible? No. Avoid these scam sites.
No experience necessary? No one pays you without experience. It means that all they are interested in doing is selling you their bogus product and getting that registration fee from you.
You can make hundreds of dollars each day without doing much work? How so? Is their any guarantee of this?
Have they told you exactly what you have to do or are they just simply sticking with giving you vague notions of form filling and data entry and telling you to pay up before they reveal this secret. The truth is there ARE NO SECRETS.
Is there a physical address, phone number and a contact person listed with whom you can talk before ordering? If not then its a scam.
You are asked to call up an phone number. A 900# number for information. They make money with every person who calls ! Do not call these numbers.
Do not fall for a strong well written ad copy. It might be very convincing and it might convince you to act right away. Any website that tells you act now as the registration fee will go up in a few hours in nonsense. You can bookmark that page and come back to it after 2 days and you will realise that the ad copy reads exactly the same. As we have mentioned before do not get the “I WANT TO BELIEVE” syndrome. Think with your head and not because you wish that this opportunity was real. That’s the mark of a good sales copy. It makes you want to believe.
If you get any of these flags up while looking at a home based business opportunity, be very careful before proceeding.

What to do if you get caught in one of many Home Based Business Scams

First you need to write to the company who was involved in Home Based Business Scams that you feel has ripped you off telling them you would like your money back. If they don’t agree with you then you need to let them know you plan to notify officials. The following people should be notified.
If you read about this work-at-home scheme in a magazine. Let the editor know the particular company is involved in Home Based Business Scam. The Attorney General’s Office in your state or in the state where the bogus Home Based Business Scams Company is located.
National Fraud Information Centre Call them if you feel you are a victim of a Home Based Business Scams. Check out their web site for daily alerts or new Home Based Business Scams. 1-800-876-7060
Your local Consumer Protection Offices.
Your local Better Business Bureau (BBB) and the BBB in the state of the Home Based Business Scams operator.
Postmaster. If you received the misleading Home Based Business Scams information through the mail.
The Federal Trade Commission. While the FTC cannot resolve individual Home Based Business Scams, the agency can take action if there is evidence of a pattern of deceptive or unfair practices. To register a complaint about any Home Based Business Scams, write to: Correspondence Branch, Federal Trade Commission, and Washington, D.C. 20580.